This land is your land

This land is your land

Hi! We’re back in California.  Oh, we didn’t really want to be back in California, but it turns out that’s just where the travel nurse jobs congregate. This means that after 10 short weeks, we had to turn our obnoxiously red truck around and drive back across the country. Here’s our recommended course of action:

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OREGON, ORESTAYIN

OREGON, ORESTAYIN

Sometimes we meet nurses who were travelers, but they fell in love with a place or a person and decide to stay at that assignment permanently. That is not what happened to us. Oregon is nice, we like Oregon, but we do not love Oregon.

Read more to hear exciting radio, food, and weather updates!

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On Temporary Co-Workers

On Temporary Co-Workers

As a travel nurse I work with all new people every 13ish weeks which presents some unique challenges. For instance, I am supposed to learn a new set of names at each job, and I am horrible with names and faces. Luckily healthcare is a profession where all of your colleagues wear name tags. I just have to be real discreet each of the 170 times I check the name badge of the nurse I’ve been working with all day.

But it’s not just names, I also need to know each person’s role. Are you the Doctor? Respiratory Therapist? One of the many supervisors who I report to, but who I will only meet once on my whole assignment? Transport? When someone asks me “Is there anything I can help with?” I have to pause and think, is there?

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Long Winded Excuse for Not Blogging in a Month

Long Winded Excuse for Not Blogging in a Month

However busy the ER has been during Paul’s time on, his time off has made our Idaho life feel like a series of long weekends. I love a long weekend, who doesn’t? While Southern Idaho is not about to make the Lonely Planet’s list of must-see destinations, our long-weekend lifestyle has allowed us to explore a lot of wonderful just-beyond-local destinations.

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Idaho According to Idahoans

Idaho According to Idahoans

Here are statements that Idahoans have presented to me as facts which I have yet to substantiate:

1. In the lower 48, Idaho is the sate that has the most land that is the least inhabited. Much of Idaho is totally inaccessible by road.

2.     Idaho has the 2nd highest teen pregnancy rate in the nation. Recently a teacher was fired for using the words 'penis' and 'vagina' in public school, in a sex ed class, which is optional by the way.

3.     Jerome county (our current home) is the most irrigated county in the US.

This seems plausible, there are canals everywhere and children are not allowed to play in them and what’s more is that it seems like children really actually don’t play in them. A true irrigation miracle and mystery!
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Between Job Adventures: Arizona to Idaho

Between Job Adventures: Arizona to Idaho

Some of the very best parts of travel nursing are the times in between gigs. It's a forced vacation every 3 months.  During anchored life vacations you are either a) driving through familiar roads to local destinations or b) paying the big dollars to fly someplace exciting. In contrast, travel nurse vacations start from a relatively new location (Southern Arizona)  and bring you to an even newer location (Southern Idaho, what are you about?!?).  

There was SO much to see and do in Arizona and Utah, we had to pick and choose. Here's a quick photo-romp through our adventures.

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Part 3 of Step 9: Renovating our New-Used Trailer

Part 3 of Step 9: Renovating our New-Used Trailer

When I first started organizing this series of post, I tried to write what we did day by day, but the days and the tasks all blended together. We didn’t really paint first and then worry about the desk second. We made these changes all at once over the course of 10 days. Waiting for paint to dry meant you better be sanding down the headboard, or hemming curtains, or figuring out what dishes you want to haul with you. I’ve organized this series in “steps” because it’s easier to digest this way, not because we actually did these steps in this nice, leisurely order.

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Steps you need to take in order to be a travel nurse

Steps you need to take in order to be a travel nurse

1. Meet a peppery nurse from New Zealand who will convince you that nursing is secretly the best profession out there. She will call boots "wellies." She will casually talk about working in Antarctica. She will think back fondly on her time as a travel nurse.

2. Move to Chicago, get into an accelerated BS to BSN program. Somehow manage to go through school and feed yourself and pay rent. Pass the NCLEX. Get a job in the ER working the overnight shift. Stay awake on Lake Shore Drive while returning home at 7:30 AM after a 12 hour shift of ill and angry people and avoid dying in a fiery crash before you can realize your dream of travel nursing.

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Oh, to be 55

Oh, to be 55

There was a lot riding on our first placement. I was (am) still a little unsure of what I should be doing while Paul is at work. Plus our trailer was (is) still a new and unfamiliar gadget.

We hoped to be close to outdoor adventure, but close to amenities, and close to Paul's work, but in a location that didn't feel like a glorified parking lot. We knew we'd have to make some compromises, but then we somehow got ourselves a spot in Tucson's premier 55+ retirement community and we didn't have to make any compromises at all.

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We quit our jobs and moved into a trailer

We quit our jobs and moved into a trailer

At the end of December, Paul and I quit our stable jobs in Chicago to hit the open road. We'd been dreaming of travel nursing for years, and finally decided the time was right to take the adventurous leap. Neither of us had ever spent even a single night in an RV/Camper/Travel Trailer before.

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